Dap
Latex Window Glazing Compound, White, 10.5-oz.
Made in Usa
Model #
12108
Item #
602201
Dap

Latex Window Glazing Compound, White, 10.5-oz.

Latex Window Glazing Compound, White, 10.5-oz. is rated 2.8 out of 5 by 5.
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$9.49
In stock
Model #
12108
Item #
602201

Online price. In-store price & availability may vary.

In stock
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Description
Smooth, easy-working compound for glazing wood, metal, and aluminum sash. Resists cracking, sagging, and chalking. Gun grade.
  • 10.5 oz
  • Smooth, easy-working compound
  • Resists cracking, sagging, and chalking
  • Gun grade
Specifications
Specifications
SKU602201
Weight1.450000
UPC00070798120495
Country of OriginUS
Package Width0.68
Package Length0.53
Package Height0.98
Model Number12108
BrandDap
Manufacturer NameDAP GLOBAL INC
California Residents Proposition 65Warning: Cancer and Reproductive Harm-www.P65Warnings.ca.gov
Rated 2 out of 5 by from This product sags I used this product to replace dried glazing on an old window. It sagged on the vertical edges of each pane. The product was much thinner than I expected.
Date published: 2021-06-15
Rated 5 out of 5 by from It worked for me, I'll explain how - I waited until the end of fall to paint my windows, just to see the glazing (probably original, 1978 build) half cracking away. I intended to buy regular glazing compound, but I couldn't wait the 2 months it can take for traditional compound to skin over for paint before it would already be freezing outside. I saw this, and figured being water based it would skin over faster. Because it skins over faster, it'll probably dry through and start cracking faster too, but it's a compromise I made due to starting the project so late in the year. I read a lot of reviews, most of them being negative, but here's what I did and it seems fine. I chiseled the old stuff out, pulled out the points, and pulled the glass out. I then chiseled some more and sanded everything with 120 grit because that's what I had. I primed the window frame with kilz original primer. It's oil based. I did this because at that point I still thought I was going to used the regular dap 33 glazing compound. You can probably use water based primer with this, so long as you paint over with water based paint. I left it to dry for about a day. Now for glazing: I used the angled tip to fill a 45 where the window would seat. I was pretty generous with the caulking. All the excess will ooze out, and you'll be able to scrape it or cut it with a razor blade later. I laid the glass in, and pressed the sides down. Make sure everywhere you can see around the window has compressed caulking to make sure the whole face of the frame is sealed. If it's not, pull the glass up and add more caulking. Press in some glazing points. My windows are 32x24, and I used 4 on the long sides and 3 on the short sides. I probably went over-kill, 2 per side closer the corners is probably fine. After this, I used the gun sideways to make a large 45 because my windows sit pretty deep. I held the gun up a little bit, and was careful to apply a steady, oversized 45. Even still, it doesn't actually matter how well you apply it, so long as there is more than is needed laid down. I then grabbed my putty knife. The only one I have is a 6" knife, and it worked fine. I wet the edge, set it in the corner, and dragged it straight to make the 45 degree edge. This takes some skill to do straight, especially in the corners. You have to scoop out the excess, without pressing the knife into the 45 you want to keep. Just try it. Keep your knife wet. If you mess up, just add more material. The water helps keep it from drying out on you, if you drag the knife without it being wet it'll drag dry streaks and it won't look smooth. After that, use a knife or the putty knife to scrape the excess. You can wait for the caulking to dry before doing this. If you wait, you'll have less risk of messing up the glazing, but it'll take more work to scrape the dry caulking. I use a blade to cut a straight line along the glass to glazing edge before razor blading the glass up to that line. I let this set in my basement for 3 weeks. I only planned on a week, but was busy. I think DAP recommends 2 weeks if it's freezing out. I painted the exterior side of the window with exterior paint, and painted the interior side with interior paint. It's been installed for 2 months now, and it looks great. All in all, this process requires you to be a little quicker than you would have to be with regular glazing, so it's arguably harder to get an equivalent result. If you do it correctly however, you can install the window much sooner than you could had you used regular glazing. Good luck!
Date published: 2020-12-26
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Goes on quick but does not last I used this latex glazing to do a project that requires glazing a LOT of windows. It took some getting used to, but was faster than standard glazing once I had practice. I was excited to not paint all those panes. HOWEVER, in less than a year, the caulk "melted" off the panes with exposure to rain. This happensed on both the window that I glazed and did not paint (as the instructions say you can) and the windows I glazed and then later painted.
Date published: 2020-06-12
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Very easy to use Used this to reglaze replacement panes in several windows in my historic home. It was my first time fixing windows and this product is incredibly easy to use. A 10"x10" square took me about 5 minutes. I will be using this product to reglaze all my windows.
Date published: 2020-06-07
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Terrible product I used to be a professional painter. I have glazed a lot of windows in my life. This latex caulk style glazing is terrible. It is not thick enough to stay in place. The more you try and fix it the worse it gets Keeping your knife wet helps but is very fussy. I can not get the same uniform appearance that I expect from a glazing product. Maybe I got a bad batch. Back to oil based glazing. Bummer, I was excited to use it...because traditional glazing has it's cons as well.
Date published: 2019-11-09
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